What is the Management Plan?

Dartmoor National Park is an extraordinary landscape. Shaped by nature and humans over time. Steeped in history but always changing. One of Britain’s finest. It has the power to inspire and enrich lives.

The National Park Management Plan is an ambitious partnership plan, grounded in statutory purposes and duties. It aims to ensure this special landscape and the people who live and work here are thriving and resilient for the future.

It is a plan for the place as a whole, not for any individual organisation or group.

It begins by assessing Dartmoor as it is today and the changes we expect in the years ahead. It describes issues, priorities, opportunities and challenges and sets out how, together, we will tackle them over the next five years and beyond.

The plan is divided into sections. Each explains the approach and focus:

Climate change

Increasing Dartmoor’s significant role in tackling climate change. Work includes increasing carbon storage through peatland restoration, woodland management, sustainable farming, and promoting local supply chains. Building resilience to future changes in climate is an important theme of the Plan, as well as encouraging everyone to do their bit to reduce carbon emissions.

Future generations

Encouraging and involving Dartmoor’s future generations. Helping them, through their ‘Next Generation’ Vision and Manifesto, to influence decision making for years to come and to get involved in developing and delivering solutions to the issues affecting them.

Nature and natural beauty

Ensuring Dartmoor delivers for nature recovery is another important theme of the Plan; reaching across its boundary for future resilience and wider benefit. Habitats, species and landscape quality are better connected; restored, maintained and enhanced, supported by environmentally friendly land management systems. The plan accepts that nature needs space to recover, and this may lead to some areas feeling wider as nature is allowed to take its course.

Cultural heritage

Continuing to improve understanding of Dartmoor’s internationally important archaeology, built environment, history and culture; and helping people to value and care for these so that Dartmoor’s rich cultural heritage is protected and in good condition

Farming and forestry

Supporting farming and forestry businesses that are economically viable and deliver a high quality environment and local products alongside a range of other public benefits.

People

Enabling visitors to have a positive experience on Dartmoor. Reaching out to people from all backgrounds and connecting them with this special place, recognising and extending the health and well-being benefits that a visit to Dartmoor brings. Inspiring people to take action to care for the National Park and reduce their own carbon emissions.

Communities and business

Helping to make Dartmoor a great place to live and work.  Supporting sustainable high quality development and travel, helping communities and businesses thrive and ensure people can connect with the landscape and one another.

Dartmoor National Park Authority (DNPA) prepared the draft Plan with the help of many organisations and people. There is a need for change, we are seeing this internationally, nationally and here on Dartmoor – if we are to achieve our vision and see positive change for Dartmoor we will need to work together and find new solutions. All of us will play a crucial role.

Frequently Asked Questions

▼ Whose Plan is it? Who is it for?

It is a plan for the place as a whole, not for any individual organisation or group. 

Dartmoor National Park Authority (DNPA) is responsible for preparing the draft Plan, but it was prepared with the help of many organisations and people, and will require a wide range of partners to help deliver it. The Plan is a call to action for individuals, land managers, communities, businesses, public bodies, voluntary sector, and other organisations to work together and with the National Park Authority to deliver the Plan. It also includes the Vision of the Next Generation of people who will be the future custodians of Dartmoor.

▼ Is it the same as the Local Plan?

No, the Management Plan and Local Plan are different. They are both statutory Plans that the National Park Authority is required to prepare. The Local Plan is required under town and country planning legislation and sets the policies for determining planning applications. The Management Plan is required under the legislation relating to National Parks, and is a broader, strategic Plan for Dartmoor.

▼ Where can I view a copy of the Plan?

You can view the plan online.

Copies are also available at:

  • the National Park headquarters in Parke, Bovey Tracey
  • National Park Centres in Princetown and Haytor
  • Offices of West Devon and South Hams District Councils, Teignbridge Borough Council, and Devon County Council
▼ I can’t view the plan or use the online survey

Please contact the team via manplan@dartmoor.gov.uk if you require the Plan or survey in a different format.

▼ How was the draft plan prepared?

The Management Plan has been developed over the last eighteen months. This involved gathering evidence, considering the issues and opportunities, engaging with partners through a series of Dartmoor Debates, and seeking views through a public opinion survey. Details are available on the Management Plan Review page under 'Background'.

▼ How does the Next Generation Manifesto and survey fit in?

Dartmoor National Park Authority is working with a Next Generation group to ensure that young people (roughly in the age range 18-35) are involved in the future of Dartmoor National Park. This group, who live and work in, or visit the National Park, have produced a Next Generation Manifesto to accompany the Management Plan.

The Manifesto is a separate document, owned by the Next Generation group, which includes their own Vision for Dartmoor. Specific calls for action are included in the Manifesto to influence how organisations and decision makers shape Dartmoor for its future communities, recreation users, visitors, businesses, young people, farmers and the environment, landscape and heritage.

If you are interested in being involved, please let us know by taking the Next Generation survey.